OPTIMIZING PATIENT CENTERED-CARE: A PRAGMATIC RANDOMIZED CONTROL TRIAL COMPARING MODELS OF CARE IN THE MANAGEMENT OF PRESCRIPTION OPIOID MISUSE (OPTIMA)

OVERVIEW

The use of prescription opioid medications has dramatically increased in recent years in Canada, leading to a rise in opioid misuse and related harms such as hospitalization and deaths due to overdose. The prevention and treatment of opioid use disorders has become an urgent public health priority which requires an evidence-based response that best reflects the needs of individuals with opioid use disorders and the community.

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research – Institute of Neurosciences, Mental Health, and Addiction recently launched Phase I of the Canadian Research Initiative in Substance Misuse (CRISM), a national research consortium in substance misuse modeled after the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s Clinical Trial Network. This consortium spans four regional nodes: British Columbia, the Prairies, Ontario, and Québec-Maritimes.

OBJECTIVES

The OPTIMA study is the first national clinical trial through CRISM. This trial aims to evaluate two opioid agonist treatment models of care for the treatment of prescription opioid use disorders: methadone, the current standard of care in Canada; and buprenorphine/naloxone, the therapy of choice in the United States and other jurisdictions internationally. In order to improve patient care the study will address real-world treatment conditions, including strict regulations for methadone dosing (i.e., dispensed daily at a pharmacy) vs. flexible take-home dosing for buprenorphine/naloxone.

Primary Objective:

  • The primary objective is to study the overall use of opioids over the 24-week study.

Secondary Objective:

  • Secondary objectives include studying retention in treatment, medication adherence, safety, treatment satisfaction, and patient engagement.

The OPTIMA study is designed with the intention to support patient-provider decision-making and evaluate health related outcomes with the overall goal of improving treatment outcomes through enhancing patient-centered approaches in clinical care.

FUNDERS

  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)

INTERESTED IN FINDING OUT MORE ABOUT OPTIMA?

To learn more about OPTIMA, please contact us.

Jill Fikowski, Clinical Trials Coordinator
Phone: (604) 682-2344 x66871
Email: addiction.trials@cfenet.ubc.ca
Hours: Monday–Friday 8:30am–5:00pm

MOBILE: OPIOID VITAL-SIGNS EVALUATION (MOVE) STUDY: A PILOT STUDY TO EVALUATE THE FEASIBILITY OF MOBILE MONITORING OF VITAL-SIGNS IN OPIOID USERS

OVERVIEW

The Mobile Opioid Vital-signs Evaluation (MOVE) Study is a research project funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse that evaluates the use of a mobile monitoring system to measure vital-signs—heart rate and respiratory rate—in people who use high doses of opioid medication.

The annual mortality rate due to illicit drug overdose in BC increased by 50% between 2010 and 2015. In 2015 alone, BC saw a 31.1% increase in overdose fatalities compared to 2014. The majority of these overdose deaths were due to opioids like heroin, morphine, oxycodone, and fentanyl that may have been used in combination with other drugs, including alcohol. Significant increases in drug overdose rates have been seen across North America, and in response to this public health crisis innovative strategies and interventions are currently being developed to prevent serious harm and death among people who use drugs. This project aims to help healthcare providers better understand changes in cardiopulmonary status that occur with consumption of high doses of opioids and how these changes may predict overdose risk. The ability to recognize and respond to signs of an overdose will help identify those at risk of overdose and determine safer dosing, and will allow for rapid clinical intervention and ultimately a reduction in the significant morbidity and mortality attributable to opioid-related overdoses.

OBJECTIVES

Primary Objectives:

  • To determine the feasibility of a novel mobile device to monitor specific vital-signs among a cohort of individuals who use high dose opioids; and
  • To determine the clinical utility and provider acceptability of a mobile monitoring device.

Secondary Objective:

  • To use this data to explore associations between opioid consumption and changes in specific vital-signs (e.g., heart rate, respiratory rate) post-dose.

PARTNERS

  • BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BC-CfE)
  • Exela LLC
  • Providence Healthcare (PHC)

FUNDERS

  • National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

INTERESTED IN FINDING OUT MORE ABOUT MOVE?

To learn more about MOVE, please contact us or visit our website.

Jill Fikowski, Clinical Trials Coordinator
Phone: (604) 682-2344 x66871
Email: addiction.trials@cfenet.ubc.ca
Hours: Monday–Friday 8:30am–5:00pm
Visit our website here.

Copyright © 2016, British Columbia Centre on Substance Use

608-1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC V6Z 1Y6

E: bccsu@cfenet.ubc.ca | T: (604) 806-9142 | F: (604) 806-9044